Let's take care of our land of plenty!

The Pays de Cocagne Sustainable Development Group's (PCSDG) mission is to engage citizen participation towards the sustainability of Cocagne watershed communities
page titreFor many years (1998), the Atlantic Canada Shorebird Survey (ACSS) began monitoring several sites where birds stop. The members of ACSS monitor migratory bird populations and ensure they continue to be able to rely on these major areas during migration. There are about 83 official sites in the Atlantic Provinces. The Bouctouche Dune and Cormierville Marsh are part of these sites.


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Many shorebirds nest in northern Canada and migrate south to get to their wintering areas each fall. Every spring they return north to nest again. During migration, some are able to fly at altitudes of 3,000m. During those long trips, which can reach up to 5,000 km, some birds can fly for 40 to 60 hours without stops or rest. This takes a lot of energy. That is why shorebirds need some important places where they can stop during the great migrations, to refuel. Many of these stops take place in Atlantic Canada. Over 75% of the shorebird population, about 2.5 million of them, stop in the Bay of Fundy before continuing their journey south. They can stop at sites like the marshes in Cormierville or the Bouctouche Dune, and stay for about 2 weeks.

During these two weeks, they will eat almost constantly to double their weight in order to have the necessary reserves to continue the great migration.Several species of shorebirds have been declining since1974 when bird census programs began in the Atlantic Provinces. Some species, like the Piping Plover and the Red Knot, are now endangered, because their numbers are so low. Since these birds depend on several different habitats for their survival, it is important to make sure we keep healthy places that they can use to nest, to feed during migration and to spend the winter.

Here in Atlantic Canada, it is humid areas that are most important: the beaches, mudflats, and marshes that we humans must share with animals and plants, as they too need them. This is why, for many years, the Atlantic Canada Shorebird Survey (ACSS) began monitoring several sites where birds stop. The members of ACSS monitor migratory bird populations and ensure they continue to be able to rely on these major areas during migration. There are about 83 official sites in the Atlantic Provinces. The Bouctouche Dune and Cormierville Marsh are part of these sites.

In the Cormieville Marsh, counting shorebirds has been going on since 2009 and since 1997 at the Bouctouche Dune. The two sites are visited every week between July and October. Over the years, 26 different species of shorebirds have been observed at these sites, including the Piping Plover and the Red Knot, two threatened species.

Reports

Final report for Bouctouche dune and Cormierville marsh 2019: (In French)
Atlantic Canada shorebird survey newsletter - Calidris 2020

News
April 2020: How to better protect our shorebirds?
July 2018 : 5 hatched nests, 3 lost nests, 6 adults and 8 banded chicks - preliminary inventory of the South Eastern Piping Plover
2017 : How was the season of the piping plover?
Sept 2017 (in French - article in L'Étoile)

Resources
The State of Canada's Birds 2019 (Shorebirds p.6)

Atlantic Canada Shorebird Survey (ACSS) - Environment and Climate Change Canada

Migratory birds - Canadian Wildlife Service

The Roost - Birds Canada


Acknowledgements

Counting of shorebirds at the Cormierville Marsh and Bouctouche Dune has been made possible through the financial support of the NB Wildlife Trust Fund, the Irving Eco Centre , and the help of volunteers.
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Upcoming activities

August 28, 2020 - Living shorelines workshop with Rosemarie Lohnes

A theoretical and practical workshop on a natural approach to dealing with coastal erosion will be presented in Shediac by Rosmarie Lohnes of Helping Nature Heal inc.

This approach, called "Living Shorelines", is done manually with minimal mechanical intervention. It improves the health of the coastal ecosystem while protecting your property.

Come and learn more about the theory and practice of this proven ecological method, which represents an environmentally friendly alternative to fixed structures or rip rap.

Friday, August 28th
Theoretical session: 9:00 am to 12:00 pm - Shediac Multipurpose Centre, 58 Festival Street.
Lunch break: 12:00 pm to 1:30 pm – Please bring your lunch.
Hands-on session: 1:30 pm to 5:00 pm - The location will be announced in the morning at the workshop.

The workshop will be organized in accordance with Covid-19 prevention measures. Please bring your mask. Facebook event here.

For more information :

Rémi Donelle, Shediac Bay Watershed Association
Tel: (506) 506-533-8880 E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Or

Julie Cormier, Director, Vision H2O
Tel:  (506) 577-2071    Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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